NCDP Perspectives

Emergency management is having a #MeToo moment

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This is not just an issue of fairness, victims and survivors...It is also a failure to capitalize on different perspectives that represent the community that emergency management serves.

August 8, 2019

The 2018 Hurricane Season Is Here. We Can’t Just Rely on the Federal Government to Help Us Prepare.

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This post was originally published on May 30, 2018 in Fortune. The 2018 hurricane season is upon us, and it looks like we are in for a very bad year. This is right on the on the heels of 2017, which was the most expensivehurricane season on record, requiring multiple emergency supplemental appropriations from Congress. Going forward, we need to accept the fact that the degree to which we rely on the federal government to underwrite our preparedness and response is no longer viable. We need

July 26, 2018

The Biggest Test Trump Faces With Hurricane Harvey

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This post was originally published on August 28, 2017 in Fortune. All presidents face disasters at some point in their tenure, and how they lead the nation through the response and recovery has a direct

March 27, 2018

We’re not prepared for the next public health emergency

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This post was originally published on August 21, 2017 in The Hill. From Ebola to Zika to the opioid epidemic, health departments and the healthcare system, now more than ever, must be able to work 24/7 to detect, prevent and contain multiple crises — often at the same time. Unfortunately, because of a consistent lack of funding, this life-saving work can come at the expense of addressing the day-to-day health needs — from obesity to diabetes to lead poisoning to vaccinations — of their communities. In reality, public health has faced brutal cuts over the past decade, which has made Americans less healthy and safe. The House Appropriations Committee recently approved its Labor, Health and Education appropriations bill for fiscal year 2018 in a party line vote.  And, while the Senate Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations Subcommittee has not yet publicly released its bill, there are some hopeful signs in the House version. For instance, the

March 27, 2018