9/11+10

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The ’9/11 + 10: Science, Policy, and Public Health – Looking Ahead to the Next Ten Years’ conference was hosted on September 8, 2011, by the National Center for Disaster Preparedness and the Department of Epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health at the Columbia University Low Library in New York City. This conference examined how the past events on 9/11 have influenced public health and disaster policy over the past 10 years and explore how they will impact the future. Click on the underlined links for video footage.

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OPENING REMARKS 1
Budd Mishkin (Moderator) NY1 Correspondent and host of ‘One on One with Budd Mishkin’

OPENING REMARKS 2
Linda P. Fried, MD, MPH DeLamar Professor of Public Health; Dean, Mailman School of Public Health; Senior Vice President, Columbia University Medical Center

OPENING REMARKS 3
Irwin Redlener, MD Clinical Professor of Population and Family Health; Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, College of Physicians and Surgeons; Director, National Center for Disaster Preparedness, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

OPENING REMARKS 4
Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH Gelman Professor and Chair, Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

NOTES FROM THE FRONT LINES OF CATASTROPHE: A PHYSICIAN’S REFLECTIONS ON 9/11/2001
Glenn Asaeda, MD Division Medical Director, EMS FDNY


SESSION 1: WHERE WE ARE TODAY


STATE OF THE SCIENCE: THE HEALTH AND MENTAL HEALTH CONSEQUENCES OF CATASTROPHIC EVENTS
Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

KEYNOTE | REDUCING RISK THROUGH EFFECTIVE POLICY AND PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE
Margaret Hamburg, MD Commissioner, U.S. Food and Drug Administration

STATE OF PREPAREDNESS: POLICIES AND PERCEPTION
Irwin Redlener, MD

COMMUNICATING AROUND MASS TRAUMA: IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND RESPONSE
Jeanne Meserve CNN Homeland Security Correspondent


SESSION 2: LOOKING INTO THE FUTURE


KEYNOTE | LOOKING AHEAD: MITIGATING THE HEALTH CONSEQUENCES OF FUTURE DISASTERS
Nicole Lurie, MD, MSPH Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

PANEL 1: THE SCIENCE OF PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE AND RECOVERY
Neil Boothby, EdD Allan Rosennfeld Professor of Clinical Forced Migration and Health, Director, Program on Forced Migration and Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

David Abramson, PhD Director of Research, National Center for Disaster Preparedness; Assistant Professor of Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

Jeffrey Upperman, MD Director, Trauma Program at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles; Associate Professor of Surgery, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California

Lori Peek, PhD Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Colorado State University; Co-director, Center for Disaster and Risk Analysis

DiscussantBrian Kamoie, MPH, JD Senior Director for Preparedness Policy, White House National Security Staff

PANEL 2: PREPARING FOR DISASTERS: WHAT DO WE NEED TO DO NOW? - PART 1
PANEL 2: PREPARING FOR DISASTERS: WHAT DO WE NEED TO DO NOW? - PART 2
Nathaniel Hupert, MD, MPH Director of the Preparedness Modeling Unit of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Associate Professor of Public Health and Medicine, Cornell University’s Weill Medical College

Terry Adirim, MD, MPH Director, Office of Special Health Affairs at the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration

Andrew Garrett, MD, MPH Deputy Chief Medical Officer, National Disaster Medical System, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

Daniel Fagbuyi, MD Director of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management, Children’s National Medical Center; Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, George Washington University

DiscussantIsaac Weisfuse, MD, MPH Deputy Commissioner, Office of Emergency Preparedness and Response, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

CONCLUDING REMARKS
Drs. Galea and Redlener


RELATED REPORTS & NEWS


The American Preparedness Project: Where the US Public Stands in 2011 on Terrorism, Security, and Disaster Preparedness

Findings from a periodic Survey of the American Public by the National Center for Disaster Preparedness, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, administered by the Marist Institute for Public Opinions. Ten years after the tragic events of September 11, 2001, America is, in some aspects, a different country. Significant portions of the federal budget over the past decade have been spent on enhancing preparedness and security on the home front, and prosecuting terrorism in Iraq and Afghanistan. As part of its American Preparedness Project, which has tracked US attitudes on domestic preparedness and terrorism over the last ten years, the National Center for Disaster Preparedness (NCDP) at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health recently surveyed the US population to determine their current attitudes and behaviors regarding disaster preparedness and the prospect of domestic terrorism. NCDP and the Children’s Health Fund had conducted this survey annually from 2002 to 2008. As in prior years, the Marist Institute for Public Opinion (MIPO) executed a survey designed by NCDP and CHF. Also as before, the 2011 survey included a mix of previously-asked questions and new questions inspired by recent world events. Trended questions asked about confidence in government; extent of personal and family preparedness; and perceptions of community preparedness.

Conference featured in Time Magazine: Why Our Public Health System Isn’t Ready for Another 9/11


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